The last will and testament of Rosalind Leigh.

Directed by Rodrigo Gudino, The Last Will and Testament of Rosalind Leigh has some great scenes with a scary apologue.

Opening with an old woman, Rosalind Leigh, narrating about her son. The premise is then focused on a man, Leon Leigh (played by Aaron Poole) who inherits the house of his recently deceased mother. The home is crammed with strange ornaments, religious musings and ominous statues of angels all around. Over the course of the day and night the son is confronted with his past and the belief that his mother’s spirit is attempting to communicate with him.

The Last Will and Testament of Rosalind Leigh is an ambiguous slow burner that relies on atmosphere and teasing intrigue rather than violence or normal haunted house jump scares. It explores, in equal measures, the loneliness, pain, and fear that exist inside, outside, during life, and after it.

The last will and testament of rosalind leigh.

There are some cult elements that begin to unravel into the story, but unfortunately you never get to learn the extent of the cult and it is never really explained or explored within the story in enough details.

A negative I do have is just as you begin to get into the details given and things start to get really interesting, Leon decides he is going to leave, which is frustrating as I would’ve be nice to find out more.

Most of the visual aspects of the movie are very pleasing to the eye and the antique items that clutter the house well shot and has you browsing each and every corner looking for details.

The acting wasn’t well done and the story-line had great potential but the lack of information spoiled it in a sense for me.

Another small negative I have is the creature, without spoiling too much, the close up slightly destroyed the scares the film had previously given me. The effects were bad.

With the The Last Will and Testament of Rosalind Leigh, Rodrigo has crafted an intriguing, chilling little puzzle box barring a couple negatives.